The Damage Profile
AIRCRAFT ORDNANCE

You defined the weapon types and their specifications under [GUNSTATIONS] and the amount of ordnance carried under [GUNS.n]. Now it's time to specify just where this ordnance is to be carried and how it will be released or fired.

All combat aircraft have hardpoints, reinforced structures designed to carry heavy loads such as bombs, rockets, torpedoes, external fuel tanks, etc.. Every weapon (except guns) needs a pylon on which it can be hung.

The [HARDPOINTS] section defines the location where on the aircraft you will hang your ordnance.

NOTE
CFS2 limits the number of defined hardpoints to 26.

In its most general form, a [HARDPOINTS] entry will look like this ...

   mount.number=X position,Y position,Z position

Here's a sample [HARDPOINTS] entry ...

[HARDPOINTS]
mount.0=0,-0.787,0
mount.1=0,-0.787,0
mount.2=0.805,-0.711,0
etc. ....

The parameters (separated by commas) are ...

[HARDPOINTS] ;Centerline pylon

weapons header. Identifies a single weapon attachment point. The trailing remark is for your benefit. It simply identifies the ordnance mount you're working with.

mount.0=0,-0.787,0

ordnance mount number. Listed in consecutive order, beginning with "0." Use as many of these entries as required to define each weapon attachment point on your aircraft.

mount.0=0,-0.787,0

X , Y, Z coordinates (meters). Defines the attachment point for this weapon mount measured in meters from the aircraft's origin (0,0,0).

You are now ready to assemble your weapon loadouts, or payloads. This is where you will configure your weapon load for a variety of mission types from "Guns Only" to "Anti-ship" to "Close Air Support."

Payloads

In order for CFS2 to display your weapon payload you must name it. Payload names are entered in the [STRINGS] section of the DP file.

Here's a sample set of payload names for a P-38F Lightning ...

"payload_name.0"=Guns Only
"payload_name.1"=Guns Only Long Range
"payload_name.2"=Bombs Heavy
"payload_name.3"=Bombs Medium
"payload_name.4"=Bombs Light
"payload_name.5"=Rockets
"payload_name.6"=Rockets Long Range
"payload_name.7"=Rockets & Bombs Medium
"payload_name.8"=Strike

The [PAYLOADS] section of the DP file assigns these names to specific weapon packages.

[PAYLOADS]
payload.0=%payload_name.0%
payload.1=%payload_name.1%
payload.2=%payload_name.2%
payload.3=%payload_name.3%
payload.4=%payload_name.4%
payload.5=%payload_name.5%
payload.6=%payload_name.6%
payload.7=%payload_name.7%
payload.8=%payload_name.8%

In its most general form, a [PAYLOAD.n] entry will look like this ...

   mount.number=object DP filename,load, sync_wi_mount

Here are three sample [PAYLOAD.n] entries ...

[PAYLOAD.0] ; Guns Only

[PAYLOAD.1] ; Guns Only Long Range
mount.16=wep_us_lightning_drop_gp, 1, 17
mount.17=wep_us_lightning_drop_gp, 1, -1

[PAYLOAD.2] ; Bombs Heavy
mount.0=wep_pylon_p38_wing, 1, -1
mount.1=WEP_US_2000lb_GP, 1, 3
mount.2=wep_pylon_p38_wing, 1, -1
mount.3=WEP_US_2000lb_GP, 1, -1

The parameters (separated by commas) are ...

[PAYLOAD.2] ; Bombs Heavy

group number Identifies this weapon loadout as package 2. The trailing remark is for your benefit. It simply identifies the loadout you're working with.

mount.1=WEP_US_2000lb_GP, 1, 3

mount number Identifies the ordnance mount defined in [HARDPOINTS] on which this weapon will be hung.

The order in which you list the ordnance mounts in a loadout does not have to be sequential (0,1,2,3). This number identifies a hardpoint, not the weapon order.

mount.1=WEP_US_2000lb_GP, 1, 3

object DP filename Identifies the weapon to be hung on this mount. In this instance, it's a U.S. 2000 lb gravity bomb.

NOTE
Bombs, rockets, missiles, torpedoes, etc. are all objects (BGL files) and each has its own DP file. These DP files are listed in the OBJECTS_DP folder in the CFS2 directory on your computer.

In the above example, the DP file for this weapon is wep_us_2000lb_gp.dp. CFS2 uses its own method for giving technical names to weapons. For instance, the American anti-aircraft gun is "veh_m1_40mm.dp."

mount.1=WEP_US_2000lb_GP, 1, 3

load. How many of this weapon to hang on this mount. In the real world, it's one weapon to one pylon. With CFS2 however, it's possible to hang multiple weapons on a single mount by increasing this number. If your model is a bomber and this mount was an internal bomb bay, you could hang 4 weapons on this mount. You'd only see one bomb, but the aircraft would still be lifting the weight of four bombs. Each bomb releases one after another until all four are dropped.

mount.1=WEP_US_2000lb_GP, 1, 3

sync_wi_mount. If sync_wi_mount = -1, this weapon will arm for release when you cycle through the ordnance types by hitting the "Backspace" key. When you hit the "Enter" key, this weapon will release by itself.

If -1 < sync_wi_mount < 27, this weapon will also arm for release when you cycle through the ordnance types by hitting the "Backspace" key. However, when you hit the "Enter" key, this weapon will release in synchronization with the weapon on the mount identified by the value for sync_wi_mount.

Consider this example ...
[PAYLOAD.1] ; Guns Only Long Range
mount.16=wep_us_lightning_drop_gp, 1, 17
mount.17=wep_us_lightning_drop_gp, 1, -1

Hardpoints 16 and 17 each carry a single drop tank. The tank on mount 17 has a sync_wi_mount = -1, meaning it will release by itself when you hit the "Enter" key. The tank on mount 16 has a sync_wi_mount = 17, meaning that the tank on mount 16 will only release after the tank on mount 17 is released.

This is a great feature that allows you to release bombs and rockets individually, in pairs, or in a salvo.

World War II bombers such as the B-17 Flying Fortress, the B-24 Liberator and the British Avro Lancaster didn't exactly drop their bombs by selecting and releasing them one-by-one. One switch, and the entire bomb load dropped in sequence from the bomb bay.

You can replicate this type of release using the sync_wi_mount parameter. When bombs are "linked" to each other with this parameter, there is always a very brief delay between the release of each bomb following the first one.

Here's how to set up a payload of six 500 lb bombs to release as a salvo with the sync_wi_mount parameter. Let's say you have six mounts identified as belonging to the bomb bay area of your bomber model. The correct way to drop the entire load would appear as follows:

[PAYLOAD.7] ; Sample Medium Bomb Stick
mount.0=wep_us_500lb_gp, 1, -1
mount.1=wep_us_500lb_gp, 1, 0
mount.2=wep_us_500lb_gp, 1, 1
mount.3=wep_us_500lb_gp, 1, 2
mount.4=wep_us_500lb_gp, 1, 3
mount.5=wep_us_500lb_gp, 1, 4

When you trigger the release of the bomb load, mount.0 releases first, followed shortly by the bomb on mount.1 (linked to mount.0), followed shortly by the bomb on mount.2 (linked to mount.1), etc. until all six bombs are dropped.

The incorrect way to set up this type of bomb drop would be ...

[PAYLOAD.7] ; Sample Medium Bomb Stick
mount.0=wep_us_500lb_gp, 1, -1
mount.1=wep_us_500lb_gp, 1, 0
mount.2=wep_us_500lb_gp, 1, 0
mount.3=wep_us_500lb_gp, 1, 0
mount.4=wep_us_500lb_gp, 1, 0
mount.5=wep_us_500lb_gp, 1, 0

Here, once you release the first bomb, the remaining five will drop almost simultaneously.

[GUNSTATIONS] The Damage Profile